Shoei most trusted motorcycle helmet brand

Shoei RF-SR helmet products

Shoei is the most trusted helmet brand by Australians, according to the 2018 Canstar Blue survey of almost 500 riders.

The customer satisfaction research and ratings business found Shoei topped the ratings for the third year in a row. In 2015, the first year of Canstar Blue ratings, Nolan won and Shoei was a lowly sixth.

The ratings compare motorcycle helmet brands on factors including durability, safety, comfort/fit, ease of cleaning additional non-safety features, style/design, value for money, and overall satisfaction.

Shoei was followed by Arai, AGV, Shark, Bell and Fox.

These were the only brands mentioned as they must receive a minimum of 30 responses to be included in the ratings. Previous ratings have included up to eight different brands.

Canstar Blue says this year’s survey found that durability, vision and comfort/fit are the greatest drivers of satisfaction for consumers.

The company has also rated motorcyclesgloves, jackets, boots and tyres. Click on the relevant item to read our report.

Trusted brandHelmet brand

Shoei won every segment with a full five stars, except for value for money which was won by Arai.

That’s interesting considering Arai is not a cheap brand, so riders obviously value their head more than their hip pocket.

Yet, the average spend on a new helmet is $321 and we could not find a single full-face Arai helmet that costs less than $550. Even their open-face helmets cost more than $321.

There was no rating for safety.

However, riders can view safety ratings for many helmets by checking the NSW Consumer Rating and Assessment of Safety Helmets CRASH or the British helmet safety scheme SHARP.

Our assessment of comprehensive SHARP results found Shark rated highest in safety, followed by AGV.

While surveys and ratings are important information to consider, riders should try on a helmet to see if it is comfortable and fits them properly.

For this reason, we do not recommend buying a helmet online.

Remember, every rider’s head is a different shape and helmets also have different shapes that present varied pressure points.

In fact, the Canstar Blue Survey found that 8% of riders bought a helmet that didn’t fit properly.

Survey results(Image: Intermot) helmet helmets brand

The Canstar Blue survey also found some surprising results about riders’ use of helmets:

  • 8% have ridden without a helmet on open rads;
  • 5% don’t wear a helmet when riding on private property.
  • 12% attach addition features such as Bluetooth intercom units;
  • 15% attach a camera to their helmet;
  • 11% get a headache from wearing a helmet too long; and
  • 27% believe a helmet saved them from serious injury.

3 Comments

  1. I have recently bought a helmet from Aldi. $79.95, it covers all the standards and is compliant to all Australian standards. A full face with drop down sun screen tha spare set of cheek pads and a spare screen and a decent bag. I used it on a 34 degree day and the vents work well it is also quiet. It weighs in at just over 2.3kgs the lightest of all my helmets you don’t need to pay hundreds of dollars just on a brand name or special decals, this is not a case of get what you pay for rather the manufacturer has got it right and the price reflects just that.

  2. So, I read the SHARP test procedure and I don’t get it Same with CRASH, and Snell. Their numbers seems “off”. So they basically drop test (9.8 m/s/s) onto an anvil. Impact creates rapid deceleration, and the protection or the deformation of the helmet should minimise the deceleration. A number like 500 g (G-Force) not grams, is twice “254 g Peak deceleration experienced by Jules Bianchi in crash of Marussia MR03, 2014 Japanese Grand Prix[16]” (lookup Orders of magnitude (acceleration) on Wikipedia) based on the helmet only traveling at about 28 kmph at the time of impact doesn’t make sense. Plus this doesn’t explain in any way the relativity of the number to brain injury, given that the Good rating is 240 g and bad is 500+ g. Nor does it explain what happens to either helmet traveling at ‘whatever’ speed and at what speed does fatal brain injury occur.

    I think most of these ratings test how much the helmet will survive intact, not at what speed the deformation fails and brain injury occurs.

    At least CRASH seems to be testing for rotational injury as defined in a report to Government in Sweden in 2007, as Oblique impact energy management, but every helmet fails with 1 star.

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