Rider dies after car turns across his path

DayGlo Queensland Police path car

A 27-year-old male rider from Jimboomba, south of Brisbane, has died in a collision with a car allegedly turning across his path.

The accident happened at 10am today (27 April, 2019) in Park Ridge.

Queensland Police say their preliminary inquiries indicate the motorcycle was travelling south on Chambers Flat Road when he collided with a car turning into Isla Street.

The rider was pronounced dead at the scene.

The 39-year-old female driver was transported to Logan Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Forensic Crash Unit is investigating.

If you have information for police, contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24hrs per day.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24hrs per day.

Quote this reference number: QP1900820339

Our sincere condolences to the rider’s family and friends, and our best wishes for the driver’s speedy recovery.

Turning crashes

Police at the scene say the motorcycle was stolen and the rider overtaking at the time. Police HQ have not confirmed either.

While we do not know who was to blame for the incident, we have decided to re-publish the article below as most accidents involving motorcycles and other vehicles occur when the other vehicle is turning across their path.

The result can be lethal as the rider hits the car in a t-bone fashion, rather than a glancing blow.

There are several scenarios of turning-vehicle crashes where the rider is completely blameless and others where they are at partial or complete fault.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter whose fault it is if the rider is dead.

Most common turning crashes

These are the four most common crash situations where the other motorist is turning, often without looking for motorcycles:

  1. Oncoming driver turns across the rider’s path to enter a property or side street;
  2. Vehicle pulls out of a side street into the path of the motorcycle;
  3. Motorist pulls over to perform a u-turn without looking; and
  4. A vehicle in front suddenly turns without indicating just as a rider is overtaking them.

Look for these signs

We all know drivers don’t look for motorcyclists for a variety of reasons.

So riders need to assume the worst and look out for these signs in the above impending SMIDSY (Sorry Mate, I didn’t See You) situations:

  1. If an approaching vehicle has its indicators on, assume they may turn without giving way to you and look for movement of the wheels and the driver’s head turning;
  2. Be suspicious of all vehicles coming out of side streets (left or right) and again check their wheels and the driver’s head to see if they have seen you;
  3. Treat any vehicle that pulls over as a possible u-turn or at least that they will suddenly open their door and step out in front of you; and
  4. If the vehicle in front suddenly slows, don’t take the opportunity to pass them. Be cautious that they could be about to make a turn, even if they haven’t indicated.

How to avoid SMIDSY crashesTurning crash

In all the above four situations, slow down and be prepared to take some sort of evasive action, looking for a possible escape route.

If the driver is on a side street or oncoming, try to make eye contact with them.

Make yourself seen by moving in your lane.

You can also alert drivers to your presence by blowing your horn or flashing your lights, although these may be illegal in some jurisdictions and could give the false message that you are letting them cross your path.

Don’t trust loud pipes to save you. Most drivers have their windows up, air-conditioning on and the radio turned up loud, so they may not hear you, anyway.

Besides, in all these situations, your pipes are facing away from the driver.

3 Comments

  1. Also position yourself on the road so as to be visible to drivers who may turn across your path. For example being too close to the car in front may result in an oncoming car suddenly turning across your path as the try to turn right in the small gap between what they perceive as two cars with a small gap in between.

  2. A very common problem now is many cars have dark tinted front windows which are against the law and results in not being able to see where they are looking. This is also an issue as a pedestrian trying to cross a street.

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