Rider challenges impossible speeding fine

Gerard Chee challenges impossible speed fine Harley-Davidson XR1200 trailer

A rider is challenging a speeding fine he says is impossible because it claims he was doing 150% of the posted speed when he was riding uphill around a corner towing an 120kg trailer.

Gerard Chee, 61, of Bribie Island, says he can’t remember the last time he copped a speeding fine.

The incident was caught on a covert fixed speed camera on November 11, 2018, on the uphill section of Mt Mee north of the lookout.

It’s a notorious stretch of road that police stake out to catch speeding riders.

Impossible speed

Gerard Chee challenges impossible speed fine Harley-Davidson XR1200 trailer
Gerard’s rig

However, Gerard says it was impossible for his 2010 Harley-Davidson XR1200X towing an 80kg trailer with about 40kg of load to be traveling at 90km/h in the 60km/h speed zone.

The offence notice arrived about two weeks later. The fine is $435 and four demerit points.

“I wasn’t game to go back up there and see if I could sit on any corners at 90km/h with the trailer in tow,” he says.

“However, I did a run up through that range at 60km/h to see how many I could do easily do at that speed.

“In fact there were two corners I had to do at 50 to 52km/h.”

Gerard says his Harley has only been cosmetically modified with no performance updates.

Gerard Chee challenges impossible speed fine Harley-Davidson XR1200 trailer
Gerard and his XR1200X

“With that trailer, it is impossible to do 90km/h in that corner,” he says.

Gerard had the photo from the offence notice printed out and sharpened to see more detail.

“If you look at the picture and the corner I’m exiting it’s only a few metres before I’m into the next sharp corner,” he says.

“I was trying to imagine hooking into a sharp turn like that with a trailer on; I wouldn’t do it if they paid me a million dollars.

“The camera has got to be inaccurate.

“I suggest anybody who got a ticket at the same time should challenge it because it is wrong.”

He has not yet contacted police to say he will challenge the fine as he is waiting on legal opinion.

Covert camera

Gerard says he did not see the speed camera and disagrees with them being covert.

“I saw nothing,” he says. “Covert speed cameras are morally wrong.

“They have added a clause in the legislation that they don’t need to be in plain sight if it is in the interest of public safety.

“I’ve heard they now hide in unmarked vehicles and even stand in the back of a horse float.

Police using covert TruCAM laser speed camera impossible
Police using TruCAM laser speed camera in an unmarked car with tinted windows

“That can’t be right. Fair enough they should give a fair warning.

“If they hide them, they better trust their equipment to be infallible.”

9 Comments

  1. Don’t have any comment on the speeding bit , we will always be taxed like this . I’d be more concerned about the line the rider has taken through the corner , very close to crossing the centre of the road and putting himself in a dangerous position , no margin for error . I constantly ask why anyone want to pull a trailer with a motorcycle, I’d suggest the thing has pushed him there. He admits it a 120 kg trailer , that has to push you around a lot. there will never be a trailer behind any bike I’m riding , get a ute !

  2. Maybe Gerard should offer his rig to Qpol motorcycle cop division to see if their best member can punt it uphill and through that S bend at 90 Kph! I doubt anybody would have the balls to try that, especially on a sportster towing a trailer.
    Hopefully a judge will see common sense and dismiss the fine.

  3. Next time the state government brings down a budget.. get yourself a copy and look at how much they are counting on for income form speeding tickets.

    They are like cigarette manufacturers…. Thank you for smoking.

    Or in this case.. Thank you for speeding.

    They would be in big trouble if we all stopped speeding.

    And under the Newman Government they lowered the tolerances… hardly their finest hour.

  4. Can I say that I empathise with Gerard’s situation. That said surely the hiding of cameras is not the issue. The cameras should be technically accurate and placed according to the standards approved. Am if we are travelling according to the lawful speeds the cameras would become redundant. This is an owner onus type of offence, you choose to travel over the posted speed limit and you may get caught and dealt with. The rider / drivers choice.

  5. All the evidence required to beat it is in the picture.
    If you find the Australian standard for speed radar or the police operating hand book it will state NOT TO SETUP in places where there are reflective structures that could result in incorrect readings.
    Those guardrails are the type of reflective structure it’s talking about!

  6. I was done in the same spot about a year ago.
    I also had no idea idea until the fine came to my work address -( I was in a work car) the previous time I had been along there the limit was 80.
    I spent ages trying to work out where the camera was from the photo & google street view. Turned out to be hidden behind a farm stall at the bottom of 2 Hills–which at first appears to be against protocol – but looking deeper into it the cops can justify it if the “area has a history of speeding” We are never going to win in this Police State. Riding has definitely lost its appeal with a licence with a precariously high amount of points on it!!
    Good luck Gerard!

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