KTM steers to road motorcycles

KTM is steering more and more toward the road with its latest releases.

Instead of unveiling a swag of dirt bikes at the Milan motorcycle show this week, the Austrian motorcycle company displayed mainly road bikes.

While everyone was waiting to get their first live view of the hotly anticipated SuperDuke 1290 R, it was a trio of small-bore sportsbikes that caught a lot of the attention.

KTM RC125
KTM RC125

The RC390, RC200 and RC125 are natural extensions of the Austrian company’s dominant presence in Moto3.

They are all powered by liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, DOHC, 4-valve, single-cylinder engines and the bikes’ steel tube trellis frames have been optimized for street/track use.KTMs
Differences from the 390/200/125 Duke series are a steeper steering head, less trail, shorter wheelbase and a more aggressive suspension setup with firmer spring rates and reduced travel. The bikes are fitted with high-end components like a 43mm USD fork from WP, Brembo brakes, ABS and 17-inch alloy wheels shod with 110/70 (front) and 150/60 (rear) tyres.

KTM Australia marketing and communications manager Greg Chambers says they will import the RC390 only and it will arrive in November 2014. Price is not yet confirmed.

“The RC line-up looks pretty amazing, beautiful styling,” he says. “The road side of our business is really gaining momentum.”

But the big drawcard was always going to be the KTM’s SuperDuke 1290 R that they call “the beast” even though most of the information about it had been released prioir to the show.

It has a 180hp engine, making it the most powerful in KTM’s range. The sporty roadster has a total weight of just 189kg, with acceleration from 0 to 200km/h in 7.2s.

The SuperDuke 1290 R will also be equipped with antilock brakes and traction control.

Greg says it will arrive in March 2014 at $23,495 plus on-road costs.

2 Comments

  1. I like the look of this bike except for the fact that you could drive a Mack truck through the gap between the rear tyre and the rear mudguard , how uncomfortable must that riding position be for the pillion ?

    1. The rear seats are terribly uncomfortable in most of the low-end Katooms. But again, adding the rear seats is more of a formality as the primary target market for the lower CC motorcycles is India. And in India, no motorcycle would sell which doesn’t have a rear seat.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *