Kawasaki Z300 ABS is super-safe

Kawasaki Z300 ABS

The high-stakes learner market in Australia has shifted up a gear with the introduction of the super-safe Kawasaki Z300 with ABS and a slipper clutch.Kawasaki Z300 ABS

The world’s first LAMS (learner-approved motorcycle scheme) street fighter has arrived at $5999 plus on-road costs, which is $200 less than the fully-faired Ninja 300, Australia’s most popular motorcycle.

Not only does it feature the world’s smallest ABS, weighing just 2kg, but another great safety device for novice riders is the assist and slipper clutch. This will make novices look like pros as they quickly shift down gears without having to worry about locking up the rear wheel.

The Kawasaki Z300 ABS comes in metallic “Raw Graystone” and “Candy Flat Blazed Green”.Kawasaki Z300 ABS

It uses the same tubular steel chassis, wheels, brakes, suspension and 296cc parallel-twin liquid-cooled engine as the popular Ninja 300.

However, it has the street-fighting style of its bigger Z brothers and, of course, gets straight bars for an upright riding position.

The Z300 has a kerb weight of 170kg and a flared fuel tank that holds a large 17 litres, which should give it substantial cruising range.

The engine is fitted with a sleeveless, die-cast aluminium cylinder, lightweight coated pistons and dual throttle valves.Kawasaki Z300 ABS

Kawasaki claims the sporty LCD instrument panel is visible in all lighting conditions. The comprehensive panel features a speedometer, clock, fuel gauge, dual trip meters, odometer and Economical Riding Indicator to encourage fuel saving.

Meanwhile, Kawasaki Australia spokesman Milo Dokmanovic says the single-cylinder naked  Z250 SL will be available in 2015, but not the fully-faired Ninja 250SL.

Kawasaki Z300 ABS

7 Comments

  1. Calm down Ducati fan boys. I have a Ducati and have had a Kawasaki and unfortunately in terms of safety and reliability the Kawasaki wins, even the ultra cheap Kawasaki like the ninja 300. The Ducati on the other hand is higher performing and a responsive bike but it is more unsafe in my opinion as I have had more leaking seals, problems with brakes, oil leaks etc and I do not feel confident or safe taking it on 2,000km road trips whereas the Kawasaki I had absolute confidence in taking it on any trip.

  2. I can`t comment on this because I don`t like Kawasaki as a brand and as a product. They sell cheap power, without considering the rider…period. I will not be able to remain impartial.
    I like bikes that have Italian blood, with Ducati at heart.

    Honestly, I would not ride it and even if I only had 5999$ in my account set aside for a bike I would wait and safe more than buy it. My life would depend on those two wheels and I think it is worth way more than 5999.
    Also, they present the bike as safe and LAMS dedicated, but you put the ABS optional? No Traction Control, anti-wheelie, etc?

    I told you I can`t remain impartial….

    1. ABS is NOT optional on this bike. In fact, Kawasaki has led the Japanese brands with the addition of ABS and this is the first learner bike with a slipper clutch. Kawasaki has a long and significant history as a manufacturer and produces many quality products. It’s no accident that the Ninja 300 is the top-selling bike in Australia.

  3. Hi Mark,

    Sorry, but this is not “The world’s first LAMS (learner-approved motorcycle scheme) street fighter”

    Ducati Monster 659 has been on the market for a long time and it is LAMS and it also falls under the street fighter class.

    “The “less-is-more” philosophy that has made the Monster a motorcycling icon is now accessible to Learner Riders with the new Monster 659, produced exclusively for the Australian market and the Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMs) by Ducati, Italy.” @source Ducati.com.au

    1. Thanks Daniel. But is the Monster really a streetfighter? It’s a dedicated naked bike. It’s a bit pedantic, but by definition, a streetfighter is a naked bike derived from a fully faired bike.

      1. I was thinking of that after I posted…

        Older models shared the frame with the SuperSport so I think that is where my confusion appeared.

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