Indian Emflux ONE electric coming

Emflux ONE electric motorcycle electric motorbike

Not an Indian Motorcycle electric bike, but an Indian-made Emflux ONE electric bike may soon be coming to Australia.

The fully-faired sports tourer has a top speed of 200km/h, 80% recharge time of 36 minutes, range of 200km in the city and 150km on the highway at 80km/h.

They will cost about $US9350 (about $A12,000) for the base model and $US17,150 (about $A22,000) for the top model with Ohlins suspension, carbon fibre panels and forged alloy wheels.

The Emflux ONE features a lightweight trellis frame, 9.7kWh battery pack, single-sided swingarm, 60kW motor and single-speed reduction gearbox.

An interesting feature is Bluetooth connectivity to a phone with a special app that will locate and book charging stations, if they exist!

It also features a “Parking/Walking Assist” which is goes forward and in reverse at 3km/h maximum to help you get in and out of tight parking spaces.

Emflux Motors CEO and co-founder Varun Mittal told us they will make 199 bikes for the Indian market and 300 more for export.

“We will be expanding to other countries in the near future such as, but not limited to, Australia, Indonesia, some European countries, US and some African countries,” he says.

“We are connecting with people in these countries, but the final decision would be based on the responses from these countries and regulations for EV.”

With Harley-Davidson announcing they will release their electric bike next year, companies like Emflux Motors will have to get a foothold in the electric vehicle market before the big companies move in.

Emflux MotorsEmflux ONE electric motorcycle

Emflux Motors developed the electric drivetrain including the battery, battery management system, charger, motor controller and the motor for two- as well as four-wheelers.

They will not only sell the electric bike but also by license their technology to other companies.

Emflux consists of 25 engineers, designers and others from various fields.

Varun, an electronics whiz, founded the company with computer graduate Ankit Khatry, and TVS motorcycle designer Vinay Raj Somashekar.Emflux ONE electric motorcycle

Except for the brakes, tyres and suspension, every component on the Emflux ONE has been designed and engineered in-house.

More details are available on their website.

Emflux ONE specifications

  • Price: $US9350 (about $A12,000) for the base model and $US17,150 (about $A22,000) for top model
  • Chassis: Tubular Steel Trellis, Single-Sided Tubular Steel Swingarm
  • Suspension: 43mm Upside Down Forks (Upgradable to Öhlins Race and Track USD 43mm forks with Adjustable Preload, Damping and Rebound); 46mm Mono Gas Shock (Upgradable to Öhlins with 46mm Monotube Gas Shock with Adjustable Preload, Damping and Rebound)
  • Brakes: 300mm discs with Brembo monoblock 4 piston radially mounted calipers; 220mm disc with Brembo fixed caliper, ABS
  • Tyres: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 120/70 ZR17; II 180/55 ZR17*
  • Wheels: Cast Alloy (Upgradable to Forged Alloy)
  • Wheelbase: 1395mm
  • Seat: 810mm]
  • Rake: 23.5 degrees
  • Wet weight: 169kg
  • Battery: Emflux™ Li-ion, Liquid Cooled Modular Battery Pack with Integrated High Power Samsung® Cells*
  • Nominal Capacity: 9.7KWh
  • Charger Type: Emflux™ WARP Charger™
  • Charging time: 80% in 36 minutes from WARP Charger™, 3 Hours from Regular 15A Wall Charger
  • Cooling System – Air cooled
  • Motor: Emflux™ 3 Phase AC Induction with Liquid Cooling
  • Torque: 84Nm (Limited to 75Nm from the controller)
  • Power: 60kW (Limited to 53 kW (71hp) from the controller)
  • Transmission: Primary Reduction – 58:19, Direct Drive
  • Battery Warranty: 100,000km/5 years (More than 80% of the initial capacity)
  • Motorcycle Warranty: 100000km/5 years (Except for normal wear and tear)
  • Top Speed: 200Km/h
  • 0-100Km/h: 3 seconds
  • Range: 200km (city), 150km @ 80km/h

8 Comments

  1. Almost all evs are a bad joke played on the environment and anyone stupid enough to think they are saving the environment.
    Electric busses like they have in Russia and sanfransisco that use a direct contact overhead grid are the most environmentally friendly vehicles available. All cities should have such a system If backed up with smaller taxi or shuttle busses there’d be hardly any reason to take a car into town.
    But if EVs are to be a viable thing someone needs to come up with an exchangeable battery pack that fits all vehicles. Instead of buying an EV and the batteries you’d buy or lease the EV without batteries and lease the required number of battery packs from a specialist energy company. Then when they run flat you’d pop into a battery station and do a quick swap and drive away with a fresh load of batteries. You’d still charge them when you’re parked over night or at work but if you’re on a trip there would be no worries about range and a swap would only take a few minutes not hours to recharge with the risk of fire rapid charging has.

    1. As I recall, Brisbane had electric trolley busses at one stage. Their nickname was “whispering death” since pedestrians could not hear them coming and they walked in front of them, and that was even before the Sony Walkman was invented.

  2. Not a bad looking little jigger with a fairly accessible-looking seat height and comfortable height handlebars. The seat height is one thing, swinging a leg past the fashionably raised tailpiece would be something else.
    If the price can be kept under AU$20k, it could take off in the cities.
    I wonder how good the EV bikes are at pulling wheelies at low speed. I assume they should be pretty good at it.
    The battery range is still not enough my for typical loop to the twisties and back. Perhaps some country tourist towns will consider installing charge points for electric vehicles. While the vehicle is on charge, the associated passengers are very much a captive audience with time to kill and hopefully money to spend.
    Perhaps “motorcycle friendly” towns will evolve into “EV motorcycle friendly” towns.

  3. “•Range: …………….. 150km @ 80km/h”

    Sounds good, until you read the fine print! At 100km/h and above the range is probably much less, and inadequate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.