Essential Roadside Emergency Supplies For Your Motorcycle

Harley-Davidson Project Rushmore Ultra test simple supplies

Contributed post on emergency supplies for our North American readers

Roadside emergencies can happen anytime and anywhere. Being prepared for any scenario can save your life — from hit and run accidents to flat tires on the side of the road, having the tools to deal with an unexpected emergency can save you a lot of time and headaches.

In many cases, being able to help yourself or others in a roadside emergency situation can be vital to your own and others’ survival. When help is still far away, knowing what to do in an urgent situation and having the proper supplies right with you in your storage box can make all the difference.

Just ask the legal experts from Davis, Saperstein & Salomon, P.C. about the advantages of having the proper roadside emergency supplies for your motorcycle. In the case of accidents caused by either poor weather conditions or by another vehicle, being able to take action right on the scene can save you money and hassles later on.

Every rider should have the barest emergency supplies packed in their storage box at all times. Take a look at our comprehensive list of the most important items that you should keep with you when out your motorcycle, just in case of emergency.

First Aid Kit

Touratech first-aid kit solo supplies
Touratech first-aid kit

Purchase a pre-packaged first aid kit to keep in your storage box at all times. Bandages, ointments, and medications should be included in the bare essentials of each kit.

Duct Tape

This fix-all product has nearly unlimited uses in any emergency situation. Treat wounds, make small repairs or tape up broken parts with ease. Make sure to have at least one full roll of duct tape in your emergency supplies.

Tire Repair Kit

Getting a flat can be a real pain. If you are near an urban area, you may be able to get away with a temporary fill up on the roadside or have your tire patches at a nearby garage. Carry a tire gauge with you to check your tire pressure before you head out on any longer trips. A low tire may not blow on you, but it can affect your mileage and performance.air hoses tyre pressure gauge supplies

Multi-Tool

A good quality multi-tool can be a literal lifesaver. Make sure that you have at least one blade and as many utility blades as possible for the best protection and service.

Victorinox SwissTool supplies
Victorinox SwissTool

Spare Light Bulbs

If there’s one thing that keeps you safe on the road, it’s your taillights, headlights and turn signals. These components are crucial to making you visible to other vehicles on the road, especially once the sun goes down. Make sure to keep a couple of spares in your storage box so you can replace a burnt-out bulb as soon as possible, keeping your motorcycle at its most visible.

Thermal Blanket

Accidents can happen in any type of weather, but the consequences can be harsher when there’s rain or snow. Make sure you have a thermal or fire blanket packed in your storage box at all times — you never know when you might need it.

Water

There is no way to tell when you may become stranded on the roadside. Staying properly hydrated can be the key to your survival and comfort. Make sure to keep several bottles of water or a reusable water bottle (full of water, of course) with your supplies.

Food

Protein bars and meal supplements can be a lifesaver when you run into a roadside emergency situation. It could be hours until you have a chance to eat, so pack some high protein snacks with your supplies to tide you over until you can have a proper meal.

One thought on “Essential Roadside Emergency Supplies For Your Motorcycle

  1. Basic touring kit should include a small LED torch. Get the longest lasting batteries you can, when you need it, you need it to work.
    Make space for some toilet paper. Not every public convenience you use will be well stocked if at all. You don’t have to carry a whole roll. When a toilet roll at home gets down to maybe 10mm (or maybe half an inch) just flatten it and put it in a ziplock bag. Not every roadside emergency will be bike-related.

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