Crash statistics on motorcycle helmets

Icon Airframe Statistic motorcycle helmet

Talk about rubbing your nose, ears, chin and whole head in it … Icon has released a new version of its Airframe motorcycle helmets with crash statistics.

The numbers you see on the helmet represents the crash statistics for that part of the helmet to be damaged in an accident. Therefore, it’s the likelihood of your head suffering injury in that area if you don’t wear a helmet, or for your nose or chin to hit the deck if wearing an open-face helmet.

Interestingly, Icon also makes open-faced helmets! However, that hasn’t stopped them appealing to the safety conscious with this new design.Icon Airframe Statistic motorcycle helmets

The crash statistics come from the aptly-named Hurt Report and show that the most common area of impact on motorcycle helmets is the chin at 19.4% which spells “ouch” for open-face helmet wearers. The least vulnerable place is the very top of the head at 0.4% which sort of makes a mockery of those little Nazi-styled caps some riders wear.

Icon helmets are no longer imported into Australia, but it’s a good helmet for the American market where some states still allow riders to choose not to wear a helmet. Icon Airframe Statistic motorcycle helmets crash statistics

According to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, for every 100 motorcyclists killed in crashes while not wearing a helmet, 37 could have been saved had they worn helmets. Yet, the use of motorcycle helmets in the US continues to decline to about half from 71% in 2000.

As for the argument about a full-face and open-face motorcycle helmets, I know I’ll be riding with an open-face helmet when I ride a Harley-Davidson Ultra Ltd from Rocky to Cairns over the next few days. It’s going to be hot and sticky work behind that huge fairing in North Queensland!

The options are to wear a full-face helmet and prevent an accident by not passing out from the heat and lack of fresh air or stay alert and avoid an accident in the open-face helmet.

What do you think: full face, open face or no helmet?

9 Comments

  1. I had a helmet exemption up to the late eighties, it was great!! its my head.
    Gee david c everyone else probably notices when you take your helmet off
    the whining increases in volume.
    Its funny the ones I see wearing the flash gear are often doing speeds at which
    nothing will save them if they hit an immovable object
    My understanding is that impact on a solid immovable object at about 30km is usually fatal
    people are hopping onto abs, traction controlled bikes, Wearing the best available gear
    with bugger all in the way of basic self preservation skills.
    I reckon they should make helmets illegal .wearing of thongs and singlets compulsory
    Plus remove air bags and seat belts from all cars and 4wd’s and put a spike in the middle
    of the steering column aimed straight at the drivers chest
    I bet the road toll would drop by half overnight
    And better still people like david would go and find something safe to do like mini golf.
    and writing to the papers about noisy children and barking dogs

  2. Agree with Tony. After 40yrs of open facing I’ve just bought a Shark Evo-Line S3. Whilst wearing a new Lazer Dragon I had to put up with screaming wind roar in one ear for 105klm. The wind was coming at such an angle I had to turn my head hard left to avoid the noise. My hearing’s pretty stuffed anyway but I’d like to hang onto what’s left of it. So for open road work I’ll now wear the Shark and at least have the option of dropping the lid.

  3. I have both open and full face helmets for different occasions and conditions. The open face is the helmet of choice for suburban <80km speeds – it offers better primary safety IMHO. Touring its the full face on a naked bike for weather protection. I will be touring the States next year and will take the opportunity to go 'helmetless' at some stage if for no other reason than the experience. I believe in freedom of choice.

  4. Good on you Oldie – after all it’s your life to throw away, isn’t it? Oh, and I would like to offer you a job – with your ability to forecast with 100% accuracy that you will never ever have an accident under 80km/h, you must be a whiz at forecasting something as simple as the stock market.
    And of course, you killing yourself on the roads won’t affect anyone else, will it?
    It couldn’t possibly affect your friends or family.
    It definitely won’t affect anybody else involved in or who witnesses the accident.
    And there is no way on earth that the emergency crews who have to scrape you up off the road could ever be affected by dealing with a really nasty head injury, is there? After all, they’re not real people with real emotions are they?
    Oh, and the doctors and nurses who will try their hardest to save your life and then in the long term will try to restore some semblance of normality to the drooling, brain injured husk of a person in that rehabilitation bed – well, they just do it for the money and don’t care about the patients.
    Oldie, you may have got older, but you certainly haven’t grown up. Have you actually ever worn a modern full face helmet for more than 30 seconds? It’s not like being in a fish bowl, and in fact I only really notice mine when I get off the bike and have to remember to take it off.

  5. Brilliant marketing move by Icon. Likely to not have a big effect though. To be honest of what I’ve seen and heard, there are no where near as many American motorcyclists as there are casual/rare users of motorcycles. That is – people who casually ride motorcycles are more common in the US than they are in Aus or in Europe. Therefore it’s unsurprising that more people are using less gear than before the US market. As a motorcyclist in Aus, we get rorted re gear prices here, I personally would love to have access to the American market of safety gear without forking over an arm on shipping costs.

  6. I wear an open face lid, rain, hail, or frost. Full face lids are too constrictive on me as I feel like I’m stuck inside a fishbowl. If the law here allowed me to ride without a helmet up to say 80km/h I would jump at the chance. But, lids need to be worn on highways and motorways, even if only to cut down the massive wind-rush in your ears. I hate the Nanny State philosophy of protecting us from misadventure, and am happy to take my life in my hands, at my choosing.

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