Blown away by supercharged tourer price

Kawasaki H2 SX centre stand

While the supercharged Kawasaki H2 costs almost $40,000, the touring version will blow you away at $34,999 ride away including panniers and centre stand.

Kawasaki Motors Australia national sales and marketing manager Robert Walker says the reason for the comparatively low price is simply “global volume”.

He says the H2, H2 Carbon and H2R track-one models are niche products made in low volumes.

On the other hand, the H2 SX SE will be produced in big volumes.Kawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer

He says it will replace the 1400 GTR which will be phased out in Australia.

Also affecting the price is the SX SE comes in Emerald Blazed Green with Metallic Diablo Black paint rather than the special mirror-chrome paintjob of the H2.

The ride-away price is based on the Sydney 2000 post code. Prices at your dealer may be a few hundred dollars more or less.

You can calculator the exact price for your postcode by visiting the website and clicking on the “How Much?” tab.

Price includes includes stamp duty, 12 months compulsory third party insurance, 12 months rego, statutory fees and charges, dealer delivery and any current promotions.

Superpowered tourerKawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer

The Ninja H2 SX SE is powered by the same supercharged 998cc in-line four as the H2, but tuned for “more practical road use” and  better fuel efficiency.

Yet it retains the H2’s peak power of 147kW with 154Nm of torque and three engine modes for full power, middle and low.

Further monitoring the brute power is an Inertia Measurement Unit with rider electronic controls for traction, corner braking, wheelies and engine braking.Kawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer

There is also a hydraulic slipper band assist clutch for a light lever feel and no rear-wheel lock-ups under downshifting.

Speaking of which, it will have lightning shifts with a clutchless quick shifter both up and down.

The SE comes standard with cruise control, TFT colour screen, steel-braided brake hose, LED lighting, comfort seat, DC socket, large windscreen, centre stand, frame sliders, knee pads, a helmet lock and panniers.

Kawasaki H2 SX supercharged tourer
Colour TFT screen

When you remove the panniers, there are no visible panniers rails or racks.

It sits on fully adjustable supersport-sourced suspension with a lightweight trellis frame delivers light, natural handling.Kawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer

6 Comments

  1. Spot on. 100% agree. Politicians love it perfect bike to put there hands in or pockets and legally steel revenue on behalf of our safety. LOL. Why don’t you build us decent roads and Australia would be safer place to ride. Beautiful machine I sold my zx-14 but when Kawasaki puts out something like this it makes yo want to leave this once called lucky country that is long gone many years ago just to be able to ride this beautiful piece of technology like it was intended.

    1. The passenger will feel like they’re doing 140mph on a bar stool. There’s no top box. The mirrors show nothing but your elbows, and don’t keep your hands warm nor dry. Nor does it have high handlebars, non-cramping leg room, tall adjustable windshield (the “tall” one fitted is a joke). No decent seat (even their “comfort” version is clearly a flat plank). But that’s ok, because you won’t get further than 200km on your fuel tank. Certainly not the 400km-ish of a GTR. You’ll be stopping all day, and never come halfway towards Dave’s record-setting GTR rides.
      It’s an upgrade option of the Ninja 1000S. I’m sure it’s a nice bike, but it’s no replacement for the mighty GTR, which was a REAL tourer.
      Clearly, the folks at Kawasaki Australia have never ridden more than 200km in a day. Tourer? HAH!

  2. A 200 hp supercharged sport-tourer…looks awesome and I bet it goes like stink. But in today’s climate of overzealous speed enforcement and endless campaigns against speed, you’d only have to wind it on half a turn and you’d lose your licence and become a social pariah into the bargain. 10-15 years ago you could probably take it out somewhere remote and have a bit of fun, but these days it is different. You could take it to the track I suppose, but a Gixxer would be a better – and far cheaper – option there. So I am kind of struggling to see the relevance of bikes like this here in nanny state Australia; Germany or somewhere like that – where people are treated like adults and allowed to drive to the conditions – I can understand, but here…?

  3. Those posts in the background (pics 1&3) would probably kill or seriously injure anyone who came off, 70ks or 100ks, speed makes no difference.

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