Handy Andy Tool for motorcyclists

Andy Tool from Andy Strapz

If there is no room in your luggage or under your seat for a toolkit, you can still rely on this handy Andy Tool from Andy Strapz.

This multi-tool is 18 tools in one small stainless-steel device that slips inside a handy pouch that you can attach to your belt, slip in your backpack or under the seat.

Australian motorcycle accessories and luggage experts Andy Strapz have some clever and useful gear for motorcycle travel and this magic little combination Andy Tool is no exception.Andy Tool from Andy Strapz

It is made of #420 Stainless with 48HRC hardness and includes the following features:

  • Flat Screwdriver
  • #2 and #3 Phillips Screwdriver
  • Bottle Opener
  • Box cutter
  • 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13 and 14mm end spanner
  • 4, 5, and 6mm Allen key
  • 1/4- and 7/16-inch end spanner
  • The Chinese-made tool costs just $18 with free untracked postage and comes with a pouch and a five-year warranty.

“It won’t rebuild a basket case resto but it might just get you out of trouble,” Andy says.

“Tightening a loose screw or bolt is often left because pulling out the tool roll can be a pain.”

This handy Andy Tool may be the easiest alternative!

3 Comments

  1. It seems like a very useful tool. A pity it looks so much like a (steel) shuriken, this means one might get in trouble with the law. At least in the Netherlands it does..
    The police officers over here aren’t very likely to do a search when they pull you over, but still..

  2. Putting that thing in your pocket & then getting on a motorbike is definitely NOT a good idea. Anything that can potentially become inbedded in a human body should not be carried in pockets – this includes keys & pens in shirt pockets when driving cars. I have seen the results in many an Emergency Department!

    1. Bigjools I agree entirely with your warning about carrying items on you, but another thing that I wonder about is people who ride wearing a back pack. If there is something bulky or solid in there and the wearer has an accident and lands on their back, as I have a couple of times, the back pack can act as a fulcrum for your spine to pivot on, possibly breaking or damaging it severely and potentially facing a lifetime as a para or quadriplegic. I always carry my back pack on the bike, and while it might not look cool and be a little inconvenient, it’s nothing compared to life in a wheelchair.

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