6 Simple Ways to Increase Bike Power

6 Simple Ways to Increase Bike Power

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The motorcycle experience is much more nuanced than driving a car. How your bike responds has a lot to do with body position, throttle control, and cornering.

However, if you want a faster ride, there are some simple things you can change to a stock bike to increase power and engine performance. 

Let’s take a closer look at 6 of them …

1) Air Filters

Increasing the air intake is one of the cheapest and easiest ways of increasing power. If you imagine the engine’s air filter like your lungs, it’s job is to block unwanted air particles from getting into the engine. The stock parts can be easily upgraded so cleaner air gets through, resulting in more combustion and therefore more power.

Using a mushroom head on the air intake can also increase overall intake by about half, greatly improving efficiency.

Perhaps the only downside is increased fuel consumption and therefore more money likely spent on fuel.

Note: Your bike’s carburetor may need adjusting to accommodate. Do this by taking note of the spark plug combustion color.

2) Modified Ignition

Modifying your ignition for a bigger control angle can give you a little kick, considering it’s the ignition that generates the energy to ignite the fuel and air in your bike’s engine cylinder. An NGK gold plated or platinum plated spark plug, in particular, will create stronger sparks due to the finer ignition needle.

You can also upgrade to a low resistance voltage cap and a carbon core ignition wire (like you might find in ATVs). This ensures good fuel supply at higher speeds.

3) Fuel Filters

Fuel filters work by purifying the fuel before it hits the engine, allowing for more efficient combustion. Buying high-quality filters and regularly replacing them will keep the engine clean and maintain performance.

If you can afford to, you can also improve performance in this regard by using only premium gas, which comes with higher octane—which essentially means more combustible fuel per volume.

There’s a reason why professional racing bikes use different fuel than at the pumps. Think of it as the difference between eating a packet of Twinkies vs a chicken salad. They’re both fuel, but one is just more efficient. 

4) Lighter Parts

While lighter parts won’t directly increase power, it will increase the power’s ability to speed the bike up because there’s less force to work against.

Typically, stock parts are made of steel for strength and durability (especially from heat), but aluminum and titanium parts can be purchased aftermarket which are lighter and in some cases stronger.

Purchasing and fitting, however, can be quite expensive. If you want to upgrade your bike but don’t have the cash up-front, you might consider a $500 payday loan or more from some of the reputable sites online.

5) Performance Exhaust

If you have the funds, a custom exhaust will certainly increase horsepower by allowing more air intake and less restriction of the gases. It will also look and sound much better!

If you don’t want to go for the full replacement, you can replace the muffler and use a slip on, which will still increase power at the lower end and is a good way to give an initial boost when you ride off.

A full replacement is the best overall option, but it has to be a system manufactured specifically for your bike and one that doesn’t throw its overall performance and safety out of whack.

6) Chip Remapping

Most bikes have an engine control unit (ECU), which is a small computer chip that controls (and in a lot of cases limits) the various functions of the bike’s parts, as well as the electricals and gauges.

This can be remapped to provide more power and better performance, but there’s usually a knock-on effect (such as increased heat, more fuel usage, and shorter overall lifespan). There are also upper limitations based on the parts themselves.

You can, of course, remap in a detrimental way, so make sure the person doing it is an expert.

These are just some of the ways you can increase the power and speed of your motorbike. Got any other tips? Let us know in the comments below!

2 Comments

  1. What the hell are you doing advising your loyal readers to take out payday loans to pay for bike parts?
    People, NEVER EVER take out a payday loan unless it is a matter of life and death, even then, think twice about it!
    I am very disappointed in you guys. Where are your morals?

  2. Great article Mark. But yes you know me there is aways a but.

    You stated, “This can be remapped to provide more power and better performance, but there’s usually a knock-on effect (such as increased heat, more fuel usage, and shorter overall lifespan).” As all engines these days particularly those controlled by an ECU are already generating excessive heat, due to that magic catch cry, lean burn technology.

    The only real advancement of such motors stock or otherwise is to richen the AFR tables up, in which in turn requires advancement of the ignition tables as a richer air fuel mixture has a slower burn. Now for the knit picking, of all the bikes I have applied my ECU tunes too, the heat levels have decreased, fuel usage on the cruise has generally remanded the same.

    If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it a million times, there is only three things relevant to engine life, The knob attached to the throttle, the quality and quantity of the oil used, and the biggest of them all heat. The heat caused by Lean burn technology is crazy, so by having your sled remapped for fuel efficiency, will not only generate more power, smoother running, better throttle response, and my point is, cooler running temps. Thus in theory and of course, depending upon the knob attached to the throttle, potentially improving engine life.

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