Yamaha SCR950 joins scramble for Scramblers

2017 Yamaha SCR950 scrambler

Yamaha has joined Triumph, Ducati, BMW, Moto Guzzi, Benelli and SWM in the mad scramble to re-invent the old scrambler with its Bolt-based SCR950.

We always thought the Bolt cruiser would make a great scrambler and shortly after its release in 2014, the custom houses latched on to the idea of modifying the bike for the modern interpretation of the old-time scramblers.

The Yamaha interpretation has a vintage-style paint, fuel tank, number plates, fenders and fork gators.2017 Yamaha SCR950 scrambler

Yamaha Motor Australia spokesman Sean Goldhawk says they have “no news on that model – so not in the near future”.

“I think it would sell in greater numbers than the standard Bolt because it taps into the hipster scrambler thing going on right now,” he says.

While there is no Australian arrival schedule or pricing yet, we expect it to cost a few hundred more than the Bolt R-Spec which is $12,499.

Our price estimate is based on American pricing where it will arrive in July at $8699 which is about $300 more than the Bolt R-Spec and $700 more than the standard Bolt.

It will be somewhere between the base-model Ducati ($12,990) and probably the forthcoming Triumph Scrambler which will be based on the water-cooled 900cc Bonneville Street Twin at $13,400.

The most expensive of the new crop of scramblers will probably be the BMW R nineT Scrambler coming later this year at more than $20,000 while the cheapest is expected to be the Benelli Leoncino when it arrives in September at less than $10,000.

The SCR950 is powered by the Bolt’s 942cc air-cooled V-Twin engine, married to a five-speed transmission and has the only belt drive system among the modern scramblers.

Where it differs from the Bolt is with the bigger 17-inch front wheel, tighter rake, higher 830mm seat and slightly longer wheelbase. It weighs just 2.2kg more and will come with Bridgestone Trail Wing tyres.

We notice it still comes with the single-pod all-digital instruments which seems incongruous with the retro styling and is also difficult to read in broad daylight.

There is no word on an R-Spec version with uprated piggyback rear shocks like the Bolt.

The Yamaha scrambler may just be the impetus for the other Japanese manufacturers to do the same. Honda already has the CBSix50 concept!

Honda CBSix50 concept scrambler
Honda CBSix50 concept scrambler

2017 Yamaha SCR950

2017 Yamaha SCR950 scrambler

  • Price: about $13,000 (estimated)
  • Engine Type: 58-cubic-inch (942cc) air-cooled SOHC 4-stroke V-twin; 4 valves
  • Bore x Stroke: 85.0mm x 83.0mm
  • Compression: 9.0:1
  • Transmission 5-speed; multiplate wet clutch; belt drive
  • Suspension: Telescopic fork, dual piggyback shocks
  • Brakes: Wave-type 298mm discs, single at front
  • Tyres: 100/90-19; 140/80R17
  • Length: 2250mm (88.6in)
  • Width: 894mm (35.2in)
  • Height: 1166mm (45.9in)
  • Seat: 830mm (32.7 in
  • Wheelbase: 1574 (62in)
  • Rake (Caster Angle): 28.4°
  • Trail: 129mm (5.1in)
  • Clearance: 139mm (5.5in)
  • Fuel tank: 12.1L (3.2 gal)
  • Economy: 4.6L/100km (51mpg)
  • Wet weight: 248kg (547lb)
  • Colors: Charcoal Silver; Rapid Red


  1. There is a lot that I like about the Bolt but the cruiser riding position is not for me. So the SCR950 looks like a good thing. I wouldn’t take it on the dirt. I just think that it would be a great road bike. It would be better with a few more litres in the fuel tank.

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