Versatile X-Over motorcycle bag

X-Over motorcycle bag

This German-designed X-Over motorcycle bag is versatile, light, waterproof and comfortable.

In fact, it is our bag of choice while we travel around Mexico over the next month with Ferris Wheels Motorcycle Adventures.

This motorcycle bag comes in 10-litre and 12-litre sizes for $170 and $205, respectively, plus postage. Now, that’s quite expensive, but you don’t want to scrimp on such important items.X-Over motorcycle bag

When you are travelling, you need to be certain your bag will be tough, comfortable on long days in the saddle, secure, able to withstand heavy downpours, easy to access and won’t flap and flop around.

The X-Over motorcycle bag passes all these tests.

It’s a strange oblong sort of shape. That’s because it is designed to go over your left shoulder only. It won’t swap over to the other shoulder because of its shape.

That would be an irritation were it not for the wide and thickly padded strap.

We love a shoulder bag rather than a backpack because you can stop and just swivel the bag around to your front to access what you need without having to take it off.

But shoulder bags tend to flap around in the breeze, right?

Well this motorcycle bag can be worn in three different ways.

X-Over motorcycle bag
Three ways to wear the bag

Around town and at low speeds, it’s fine with the one strap.

If you are out on the highway, you might want to deploy the second strap which comes from behind and around the left side and links with the clip in the middle of your chest.

Once you have attached the three-point system, there is no need to undo the straps to take the bag off, you just unclip the quick-release buckle on the right hand side and it comes off in one piece.

If you are riding on rough roads or at high speed and need extra security, there is another strap inside the top pocket which has a net strap that goes over your right shoulder and links to the central connector.

In this configuration, it forms an “X” across your chest (hence the name) for absolute security yet it still doesn’t restrict your body movements.

X-Over claim it’s been tested at up to 200km/h. I haven’t tested it at that speed, but it’s fine at legal highway speeds even with the one strap.

The bag is made of tough material similar to textile motorcycle apparel.

It has storm-proof zips and two large waterproof compartments plus a small pocket on the flap that goes over the top and clips down.

I put some sheets of paper in all the compartments and threw the bag in the kitchen sink full of water for five minutes. When I pulled it out the paper was dry.

X-Over motorcycle bag
Water beads off the bag

The main compartment has a zip that goes around two sides which is very convenient for easy access. There is a removable weatherproof pouch velcroed inside which you can use to store your wallet.

There is also a big compartment in the back that I keep my laptop in, although X-Over says they have a Stanford bag specifically for that purpose.

X-Over motorcycle bag
Laptop space and comfortable foam backrests

The small compartment on the flap is a handy one to keep important travel documents, wallet and phone that you might want to access quickly.

X-Over motorcycle bag
Outer weatherproof pocket for your phone

Underneath the flap are small elastic straps that you can use to strap in your removable jacket liner.

As for comfort, so far it’s pretty good, even in this hot Mexican weather.

Most bags like this make you sweat where they press against your back, but this has three thick and ventilated foam bars that are soft and allow plenty of air to flow through so you don’t stick to the bag.

The buckles are made of thermoplastic and are strong. They don’t feel like they will break too easily.

There is also a net on one side to slide in a water bottle for quick access and a soft neoprene case on the strap for your phone, although it is too small for most of the new big models like my iPhone 6+.

The straps have reflective material for night safety, yet the black bag doesn’t look like a hi-vis vest or a Christmas tree.

It is made in Vietnam and comes in 10 and 12-litre models and

You can buy the bags via email or via their online shop.


  1. Hello Greame,

    It’s very interesting what you’re mentioned there. Did you ever tested it yourself? My experience is that most people who worn a normal backpack got spinal inquiries because all the weight of the bag is being hold from the shoulders (i had this issue before and it was painful). New technologies are proven that this is past because having the opportunity to adjust the weight with a smart technology over your hips and shoulders is very spine friendly.
    I am positive towards cross-packs and would recommend it.
    However, different people, different opinions.

  2. @Graeme
    Maybe you have missed the images with the different ways of wearing the bag which includes a second strap for the other shoulder e.g. crossover with one strap cannot be done?
    Kind Regards,

    1. No, I didn’t miss the images. However, if a backpack is going to be worn properly to prevent spinal injury, i.e. using both shoulder straps, why would anyone buy one that is designed to be worn using one strap, with a little dicky strap for the other shoulder? It seems pointless to me, when there are so many backpacks with two symmetrical straps available, most likely at a lesser price.

  3. That’s all very well, but many people have developed spinal problems from wearing their backpacks over one shoulder only. Backpacks should have two straps and be worn over both shoulders to prevent twisting of the spine.

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