Signs indicate no lane filtering zones

Lane filtering signs

Signs showing riders where legal lane filtering ends and recommences are being erected in Victorian cities to mark the beginning of the new laws from today (November 2, 2015).

Victoria is the third state of Australia to introduce lane filtering laws along with Queensland and NSW, while the ACT is in the first year of a two-year trial. Several American states are also considering introducing lane splitting, a faster version of lane filtering which occurs in slow-moving  or stationary traffic.

The Victorian Government has published the complete list of regulations.

You can read the full regulations here.

They include signs that show where lane filtering is not allowed, presumably where the lanes are too narrow.

They are indicated with a lane filtering depiction and a big red line through it, Ghostbusters style.

The end to the banned lane filtering zone is indicated by the same sign but with a black line, instead of red, the word “END”.

The Victorian Motorcycle Council has welcomed the new laws which “both improves rider safety and helps reduce traffic congestion to the benefit of all road users”.

VMC chair Rob Salvatore says that, coupled with footpath parking and a comprehensive City of Melbourne motorcycle plan, “Victoria is now a leading motorcycling state where motorcycles and scooters are encouraged as a legitimate transport choice and as part of transport policy”.

“It made no sense that riders were penalised for using their vehicle’s small foot print to both improve their safety and make progress through traffic,” Rob says. “Now filtering will be an expressly legal activity that will help to maximise the efficient use of our limited road resource for the benefit of all road users.”

“Joining NSW, QLD and the ACT and many other jurisdictions around the world, Victorian motorcycle and scooter riders can now legally take advantage of their smaller footprint, improving their safety and better sharing the roads with all other road users.”




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  1. “Signs indicate no lane filtering zones”.. Oh I like this, as a huge advocate for motorcycle safety because motorcyclist are more aware of their surroundings (I believe anyway :p) and a lane filtering / non lane filtering zone signage is a great idea.
    Unless you know the area well enough as a motorcyclist from another state it would be great to know that an section of road is to narrow to lane filter through..

    1. Whether or not to filter is a judgment call based on many more criteria than a useless sign. Simply telling riders to only filter when safe and asking them to avoid doing it in forty zones during school hours or when there is a lot of pedestrian traffic will be far better and safer than wasting money on signs.
      Posting signs will only encourage the vigilante idiots to open doors and cut people off. They will do it to cyclists and to cops because they will see the sign and see something approaching and act without thinking of the damage they will do.

  2. Mark, there are no penalty points associated with the new filtering offence: there are three penalty UNITS as a total fine. One penalty unit would be about $150 and payable as an on-the-spot fine, or three if challenged.

    You seem to have missed the positive points; no ban on P plates and no ban on filtering beside trucks or buses, both of which are prohibited in NSW and Queensland.

  3. More costly idiosy! What moron thinks more road fixtures that are hard to see and may be hidden behind trucks busses trees and other signs are a good idea?
    Putting up signs like that will only give idiot roadragers and excuse to cause an accident
    A rider paying attention to his speedo to make sure they aren’t speeding won’t see them! A rider who is observing where’s it is safe or not to filter won’t need them! The people who suggest things like this should be kept on a leash by those who are not after revenue or wear seat belts in bed.

    1. Actually Al, it’s not idiocy at all. The alternative to locally applied signage was a Victoria wide ban on filtering in all 40kmk/h zones.

      Victoria does not have school zones defined in law so we couldn’t replicate the “school zone” restriction that the other jurisdictions introduced.

      The work around for Victoria is for a set of guidelines that will allow the local road authority to restrict filtering in 40kmk/h zones where the road safety statistics or guidelines indicate a reasonable case.

      This is a huge win for VIctorian riders and filtering in Victoria.


      1. Road rules are ment to enable road users to interact safely by providing a structure and protocol so that everybody has an understanding of what everyone else is doing so they can act accordingly and predictably and safely. Driving or riding or walking or running on a public road requires an understanding of the rules and common sense and good judgment.
        While many lack the sense they were born with and have even worse judgement very few of them ride motorcycles (not for long least ways) so the bans on this and that the speed limits and signs all fail to acknowledge that the majority of riders have the good judgment not to endanger them selves or others while filtering or even lane splitting for that matter.
        The mindset that limits need to be imposed for our safety is a dangerous one and will ultimately result in more harm than good.
        As for school zones there is no need for a ban as most riders would not filter during school hours as it is too dangerous for them mothers are the worst danger in a school area and we like to keep a safe distance

        1. Hi Al, whilst most of your last post makes sense and is reasonable, it’s not really relevant to the issue of filtering signage and school zones.

          NSW, ACT and QLD all have school zone filtering restrictions. Riders have accepted that across the board as there are more unpredictable car movements and more likelihood of unpredictable pedestrians called kids. These zones have 40km/h speed limits. Riders in Victoria were ready to accept the same restriction in school zones. At the risk of repeating myself, the only way that could have been implemented in Victoria without the work around, was a state wide ban on all 40km/h zones. Clearly UNACCEPTABLE.

          As for other road users who don’t ride, they don’t need to interpret what the signs mean. It’s riders and the police that need to understand. Given the guidelines around implementation of the signs, there needs to be a fairly strong prima facie case to install them, which suggests to me and which ties in with your main point about riders being sensible in school zones, any angst about the signage is a storm in a tea cup… but we will let time tell.

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