Honda patents bike air-conditioning

EntroSys BikeAir motorcycle air-conditioner

Air-conditioning could be coming for riders with Honda patenting a stand-alone, tank-mounted air-conditioning unit.

There have been bike-mounted air-conditioning units before, but they were big, heavy and inefficient.

We’ve also seen some bizarre attempts at rider-mounted airconditioning units as well.

Two recent examples are the bulky 4.5kg BikeAir unit about the size of a tank bag and the more compact MiClimate which clips to your belt and is the size of a Harry Potter novel, weighing just 0.68kg.

Honda’s patented design is different as it sits on the tank and includes zippers and storage compartments so it can be used as a detachable tank bag.

It works by drawing hot air through mesh openings in the sides of the tank bag.

It passes over an ice pack stored underneath and a blower powered by rechargeable batteries blows the colled air our through vents in a flexible outlet directed towards the rider.

It doesn’t seem to be a conventional powered airconditioning unit, instead using an icepack that presumably you refill with ice.

That’s not such a bad idea as you can get ice refills at most service stations. You can also use the melted cold water to drink or cool down.

It is not yet known if it will be available with a motorcycle or as a stand-alone accessory.

For any rider who has nearly expired in the dry summer heat, a handy reusable unit like this could be a blessing.

The fact that it can also be used as a utilitarian tank bag makes it even more convenient. We expect it wouldn’t cost to much more than a conventional tank bag, either.

One thought on “Honda patents bike air-conditioning

  1. I have a solution that I’ve been using (and successfully patented in the USA and Europe) since 2006. The heat exchanger is mounted on the rear of the bike and pumps water via detachable leak-proof connecters to a thin inner jacket that has matrix of soft pliable tubing. The hot or cold water is selected via a simple dial on the handlebar. The prototype in the photograph is made from off-the-shelf components and has had more than 9000 miles of use. The controller in the heat exchanger monitors the power taken from the battery and the temperature sensors (thermistors) control the output temperature to the jacket.
    You’re welcome to ask for more info.
    Paul Monk.

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